Engineers Create a Wireless Charger You Can Cut to Shape

first_imgStay on target A wireless charger on bags and clothing in any shape you can imagine? Yes, it’s possible.Researchers from the University of Tokyo developed a new system to charge electronic devices wirelessly — and it involves the first-ever cuttable, flexible power transfer sheet, which can be molded or even cut with scissors to fit different-shaped surfaces and objects.“You can do more than just cut this sheet into fun or interesting shapes,” said Ryo Takahashi, a student at the University of Tokyo‘s Graduate School of Information Science and Technology. “The sheet is thin and flexible so you can mold it around curved surfaces such as bags and clothes. Our idea is anyone could transform various surfaces into wireless charging areas.”Of course, there are already existing contactless power chargers. These and the cuttable sheet all use conductive coils in the charger to induce a current in corresponding coils in the device. However, the cuttable sheet is not only much thinner, it also has a wider usable charging area due to the way the coils are designed. These coils are also wired in such a way that provided enough of them remain intact after the sheet is cut to shape, they can still charge a device.The charger still functions after it’s cut due to a wiring method known as H-tree wiring. It can be reshaped to be incorporated into various portable objects. (Photo Credit: Kawahara Laboratory)“Currently a 400-millimeter (15.75-inch) square sheet provides about 2 to 5 watts of power, enough for a smartphone. But I think we could get this up to tens of watts or enough for a small computer,” said Takahashi.In a few years, we might just see this sheet embedded in furniture, toys, bags and clothes.More on Geek.com:This Wearable AI Translator Lets You Talk in Different LanguagesWalker the Robot Is Here to Help Manage Your Smart HomeSony’s Beer-Holding Karaoke Speaker Is a Portable Party Amazon’s New Facial Recognition Smells Your FearSnapchat’s New Snap Spectacles Will Have Two Cameras, Cost $350 last_img